MATCHA

MATCHA

What is Matcha Tea?

What is Matcha Tea?

Matcha tea is finely ground green tea that has its origins in Japanese tea ceremonies. Unlike ordinary tea, the entire tea leaf is processed for Matcha. In this way, those vitamins and nutrients are preserved, which would otherwise be lost during tea infusion.

Matcha tea is finely ground green tea that has its origins in Japanese tea ceremonies. Unlike ordinary tea, the entire tea leaf is processed for Matcha. In this way, those vitamins and nutrients are preserved, which would otherwise be lost during tea infusion.

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How is Matcha Tea made?

Another difference between matcha and traditional tea lies in the cultivation. To obtain matcha tea, the tea bushes are covered with black nets or bamboo mats before the harvest and shaded. This method is extremely conducive to the fortification of certain ingredients such as teein (caffeine), chlorophyll or the amino acid L-theanine. The shading is sometimes responsible for the magical light green color and the special Matcha taste. After harvest, treat the tea leaves with steam and dry them. Then grind the leaves in the stone mill to get a fine green powder. As a rule of thumb, the brighter the green, the fresher the matcha. Too long storage should better be avoided.

How to prepare Matcha Tea?

How to prepare Matcha tea?

To get the most out of Matcha tea, you need a bamboo brush (Chasen), a sufficiently large ceramic bowl and a small bamboo spoon (Chasaku).

In the first step of the preparation, the Matcha powder is mixed to a creamy paste. For this you best give two bamboo spoons of Matcha tea powder into the ceramic bowl and add a little bit of water. Then everything is stirred with the bamboo brush until the paste becomes smooth and without lumps.

If everything is nice and creamy, the paste can be infused with 70 milliliters of hot water. It is important that the water is no longer boiling hot, but cooled down to about 80 degrees.

Before mixing, the bamboo brush should be moistened with hot water. This is to protect the bristles from breakage. The green mixture is then beaten with the bamboo broom for about one minute until frothy.

To get the most out of Matcha tea, you need a bamboo brush (Chasen), a sufficiently large ceramic bowl and a small bamboo spoon (Chasaku).

In the first step of the preparation, the Matcha powder is mixed to a creamy paste. For this you best give two bamboo spoons of Matcha tea powder into the ceramic bowl and add a little bit of water. Then everything is stirred with the bamboo brush until the paste becomes smooth and without lumps.

If everything is nice and creamy, the paste can be infused with 70 milliliters of hot water. It is important that the water is no longer boiling hot, but cooled down to about 80 degrees.

Before mixing, the bamboo brush should be moistened with hot water. This is to protect the bristles from breakage. The green mixture is then beaten with the bamboo broom for about one minute until frothy.

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INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

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STOFFE

INGRE
DIENTS

What are the special ingredients contained in the Matcha tea?

What are the special ingredients contained in the Matcha tea?

What are the special ingredients contained in the Matcha Tea?

What makes Matcha so unique is the high concentration of soothing ingredients. Matcha contains the following vitamins and nutrients:

 

What makes Matcha so unique is the high concentration of soothing ingredients. Matcha contains the following vitamins and nutrients:

 

CAFFEINE (TEEIN)
The caffeine (which is occasionally called " Teein " in tea, which is basically nothing else than caffeine) enlivens the mind and gets the heart and circulation going. In addition, the caffeine in Matcha has a positive effect on the ability to focus. If you did not sleep well, caffeine will cheer you up.

L-THEANINE
The amino acid L-theanine is one of the ingredients that make Matcha tea so special. The theanine comes from the shading of the tea leaves. Theanin does not only cheer you up, but is also responsive and receptive. L-Theanine works together with the caffeine in the Matcha tea and provides relaxation in addition to its invigorating effect.

CATECHINS
Up to 40% of the dried tea leaf mass consists of catechins, the bitter substances in green tea. Because Matcha tea thrives in partial shade, it forms a great deal of the epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). This catechin is known for its documented effect in cancer prevention. In addition, catechins act as powerful antioxidants, which not only serve to protect cells, but also counteract the effects of UV radiation and skin aging.

CHLOROPHYLL
The chlorophyll in the leaf green of Matcha tea detoxifies the body.

 

VITAMINS
Matcha tea contains among other things vitamins B1, B2, carotene and vitamin C. These have a positive effect on the immune system, eyes, nerves and skin.

TANNINS
The tannins in green tea, soothe and disinfect a gastrointestinal tract irritated by infection or indigestion.

CALCIUM
Calcium is essential for bone formation and bone strength. It binds fatty acids in the gut and helps to prevent colon cancer. In addition, the calcium in Matcha tea has a regulating effect on blood pressure.

IRON
Iron is important for the entire energy metabolism, the cell functions and the oxygen transport in the blood.

POTASSIUM
The trace element potassium is partly responsible for nerve and muscle functions.

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The story of Matcha Tea

Even though the best matcha comes from Japan today, the green powder has its roots in China. Green tea leaves have been steamed there by monks since the 8th century, dried and ground into powder. The preparation was also very similar to the Japanese tradition. Matcha tea came to Japan in 1191. The Buddhist monk Myoan Eisai had studied Buddhism and Philosophy in Anhui Province, China and returned to Japan with the priceless knowledge of the Matcha tea. Included: A handful of green tea seeds.

The following years Myoan Eisai were characterized by matcha tea, its preparation and the silent way of tea. He wrote books on Zen and Matcha and was one of the first to put the healing and beneficial effects of Matcha Tea on the body and mind on paper. What made Matcha Tee so special for monks was its effect on the meditating spirit. It was mainly consumed because Matcha tea helped the monks stay awake and alert during persevering meditations. Incidentally, Matcha tea only arrived in Europe about 400 years ago.

Today, Matcha tea, with the colorful variations of coffee shops, food blogs and cookbooks is hard to disregard.

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Myōan Eisai  
* 20. 4. 1141 - † 5. 6. 1215

Myōan Eisai  
* 20. 4. 1141 - † 5. 6. 1215